Table of Contents
Roster Verification for the 2020-21 School Year

Sample Instructional Scenarios

These scenarios are provided as guidelines for claiming instructional responsibility. We update these scenarios when changes to educational policies affect how instructional responsibility should be calculated. There were no changes to these scenarios for the 2020-21 school year.

Classroom teachers departmentalizing for instruction

Scenario
Two elementary school teachers team-teach. One teaches all students ELA; the other teaches all students math.

Solution
The ELA teacher claims 100% in the Instructional Time column on the ELA roster, and the math teacher claims 100% in the Instructional Time column on the math roster.

Classroom teachers regrouping and teaching all students on a grade level

Scenario
Three math teachers team-teach on a grade level. They share students throughout the year, grouping and regrouping for instruction based on pre-testing at the beginning of units.

Solution
Each of the three math teachers list all sixth-grade students on their rosters and claim 33% of the responsibility for each student's math instruction in the Instructional Time column.

Co-teaching

Scenario
An SpED teacher and a regular classroom teacher plan and implement instruction for all students in a math course. (This also applies to gifted, EL, and other support teachers.)

Solution
The classroom teacher claims 50% for all students in the classroom. The SpED teacher creates a roster with all students in the classroom and claims 50% for all students in the classroom (not just those on their caseload) in the Instructional Time column.

Itinerate or traveling teacher instructing students in the regular education classroom

Scenario
An EL teacher and a regular classroom teacher provide instruction to a group of students within the ELA classroom. The EL teacher works with the students on their caseload and might engage other students in the classroom as well. However, the EL teacher is not responsible for the planning and delivery of instruction to students not on their caseload. (This also applies to gifted, SpEd, and other support teachers.)

Solution
Each teacher claims 50% for the students they share (the students in the classroom on the EL teacher's caseload). The classroom teacher claims full Instructional Availability for students in the classroom who are not identified for EL services in this content area.

If the services provided by the specialists support an area other than the content area being assessed, then roster verification is not needed. For example, a teacher who teaches study skills doesn't participate in roster verification.

Itinerate or traveling teacher providing additional support outside the regular classroom

Scenario
A student receives math instruction in the regular classroom setting. In addition, the gifted teacher provides math instruction to the student outside of the regular classroom setting. (This also applies to SpEd, EL, and other support teachers.)

Solution

1. Calculate the total minutes of math instruction possible for the student in a week.

  • The regular classroom teacher instructs the student in math for 90 minutes a day (90 min x 5 days = 450 min).
  • The gifted teacher provides 45 minutes of math instruction outside the classroom three times per week (45 min x 3 days =135 min).

The total math instruction provided per week is 585 minutes (450 min + 135 min = 585 min).

2. Divide each teacher's minutes of instruction by the total minutes of instruction possible to get the teachers' percentages of Instructional Time.

TeacherMinutes of InstructionTotal Instructional Minutes PossibleMinutes of Instruction ÷ Total Instructional Minutes PossiblePercentage of Instructional Time
Regular classroom teacher450585450 ÷ 585 = .7777%
Gifted teacher135585135 ÷ 85 = .2323%
Total100%
Multiple teachers providing services both in and outside the regular classroom

Scenario
A student receives 60 minutes of math instruction from the regular classroom teacher daily. An EL teacher provides push-in services during math three times per week. In addition, the student receives one hour once a week of gifted math instruction.

Solution
1. Calculate the total minutes of math instruction possible for the student in a week.

  • The math class meets for 60 minutes a day (60 min x 5 days = 300 min).
  • The EL teacher provides math instructional support three days per week, but it is during the classroom period, not additional math time, so no minutes are added.
  • The gifted teacher provides 60 minutes of math instruction outside the classroom one time per week.

The student receives 360 minutes of math instruction in a week (300 min + 60 min = 360 min).

2. Calculate the minutes of math instruction for each teacher.

The regular classroom teacher provides math instruction alone two days per week (2 days x 60 min = 120 min).

The regular classroom and EL teachers share half the responsibility for instruction three days per week (3 days x 60 min = 180 min; 180 min ÷ 2 teachers = 90 min).

  • The regular classroom teacher is responsible for 210 minutes per week (120 min + 90 min = 210 min).
  • The EL teacher is responsible for 90 minutes per week.
  • The gifted teacher is responsible for 60 minutes per week.

3. Divide each teacher's minutes of instruction by the total minutes of instruction possible to get the teachers' percentages of instructional time.

TeacherMinutes of InstructionTotal Instructional Minutes PossibleMinutes of Instruction ÷ Total Instructional Minutes PossiblePercentage of Instructional Time
Regular classroom teacher210360210 ÷ 360 = .5858%
EL teacher9036090 ÷ 360 = .2525%
gifted teacher6036060 ÷ 360 = .1717%
Total for the student100%

Approved extended absences – teacher and substitute

Scenario: The teacher of a 60-minute ELA class was absent for 25 days on approved family leave. A substitute teacher covers the classes during this time. The student doesn't receive additional ELA instruction outside the regular class.

Substitutes don't participate in roster verification, so there's no need to calculate a substitute's instructional responsibility.

Solution

1. Calculate the total minutes of ELA instruction possible for the student in a week.

185 days x 60 min = 11,100 min

2. Calculate the ELA teacher's minutes of instruction.

  • The teacher was absent for 25 days (25 days x 60 min = 1,500 min)
  • Subtract the minutes the teacher was absent from the possible instructional minutes (11,100 min – 1,500 min = 9,600 min)

3. Divide the teacher's minutes of instruction by the total minutes of instruction possible to get the teacher's percentage of instructional time (9,600 ÷ 11,100 = .86).

The ELA teacher enters 86% in the Instructional Time column.

Since roster verification is not applicable to substitutes, the teacher is the only individual claiming instructional responsibility, and some students will be underclaimed (less than 100% instructional responsibility). In situations such as these, it is acceptable for students to be claimed for less than 100%.

Approved extended absences when multiple teachers share instructional responsibility

Scenario
A student receives 60 minutes of math instruction per day in the regular classroom. The student's math teacher was absent on family leave for five weeks. The student receives additional math support from the EL teacher two days per week for 30 minutes in the EL room. This support started November 1. The student began receiving SpED services for 30 minutes a day in math on January 9.

Solution

1. Calculate the total minutes of math instruction possible for the student.

  • To calculate the minutes of math instruction in the regular classroom, multiply the days of instruction by the minutes in the class (180 days x 60 min = 10,800 min).
  • Add the math support the student received from the EL teacher. The student started receiving services from the EL teacher on November 1, which was week 11 of 36 (60 min x 26 weeks = 1,560 min).
  • Add the math support provided by the SpED teacher. Calculate the minutes in each week, beginning in January (30 min x 5 days = 150 min). Multiply the minutes in each week by the 20 remaining weeks in the school year (150 min x 20 weeks = 3,000 min).

The student receives 15,360 minutes of math instruction in a year (10,800 + 1,560 + 3,000 = 15,360).

2. Calculate the regular classroom teacher's minutes of instruction.

  • The teacher was absent for 25 days (25 days x 60 min = 1,500 min)
  • Subtract the time the teacher was absent from the possible instructional minutes (15,360 min - 1,500 min = 13,860 min)

Divide each teacher's minutes of instruction by the total minutes of instruction possible to get the teachers' percentages of Instructional Time.

TeacherMinutes of InstructionTotal Instructional Minutes PossibleMinutes of Instruction ÷ Total Instructional Minutes PossiblePercentage of Instructional Time
Math teacher9,30015,3609,300 ÷ 15,360 = .6161%
EL teacher1,56015,3601,560 ÷ 15,360 = .1010%
SpED teacher3,00015,3603,000 ÷ 15,360 = .2020%
Total for the student91%

The total claimed by the three teachers is 91%. This is less than 100% due to the instruction provided by the substitute. Substitutes do not participate in roster verification, and, therefore, the remaining 9% of instructional time goes unclaimed.

Student changes schools during the school year

Scenario: A student attends school A for 160 days of the school year and is taught by one classroom teacher. The student moves to school B for the last 20 days of the school year and is taught by one classroom teacher.

Solution: For a classroom teacher to claim a student at 100% Instructional Availability, the student must meet the 150-day attendance requirement. Because the student meets the 150-day requirement and the classroom teacher at school A did not share instruction for the student at school A, this teacher claims the student as 100% and as F for full Instructional Availability.

The classroom teacher at school B claims the student as P for partial because the student did not meet the 150-day attendance requirement. If a student is claimed as P, the percentage of Instructional Time is not needed for the student.

Students attend virtual school with a third-party vendor (an external organization) and face-to-face with a traditional school

Scenario: For the first half of the school year, a virtual teacher employed by a third-party vendor (an external organization) provides instruction and a regular classroom teacher monitors student progress for all students in a Math I course. For the second half of the year, a regular classroom teacher provides face-to-face instruction.

Solution: Districts that use an external vendor are provided with instructions on how to approach external organization claiming. The classroom teacher that only monitored student progress while the third-party vendor teacher provided instruction is not required to claim instructional responsibility. The regular classroom face-to-face teacher and the virtual teacher with a third-party vendor both claim 50% Instructional Time for all students in this scenario. Since the students were enrolled at the same school for the entire year, the third-party vendor and regular classroom face-to-face teachers should claim the students as F for full Instructional Availability.

Student attends school using a hybrid model including virtual schooling the first half of the year and face-to-face instruction for the second half

Scenario: The student is enrolled in the same school for the entire year in fifth grade Math. The first half of the year the student attends virtual schooling. The second half of school year the student attends school face-to-face with a different teacher.

Solution: The virtual classroom teacher claims 50% Instructional Time for the student. The face-to-face teacher claims 50% Instructional Time for this student as well. Since the student was enrolled with the school for the entire year, both teachers claim the student as F for full Instructional Availability.

Student attends school using a hybrid model including some face-to-face instruction and some virtual schooling on a rotating schedule with multiple teachers

Scenario: The student is enrolled in the same school for the entire year. The student attends school virtually for one week with a virtual teacher and then attends school face-to-face for one week with a different teacher. This schedule continues throughout the school year.

Solution: The virtual classroom teacher claims 50% Instructional Time for the student. The face-to-face teacher claims 50% Instructional Time for this student as well. Since the student was enrolled with the school the entire year both teachers claim the student as F for full Instructional Availability.

If you need additional help on calculating instructional responsibility, refer to Training and Support.